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Peeing With A Menstrual Cup

Even though we chuckle at the comments left on our YouTube videos that ask “how can I pee with a menstrual cup in?” there IS something about urination that should be discussed more often when discussing cups.

First Things First: We have 3 holes.

Yes, you heard it here. We have three output holes: the urethra, the vagina, and the anus.  Your menstrual cup is inserted into the vagina, so theoretically there is no interference with urination; they’re two separate holes and a cup will neither catch nor block your urine.

However, it is possible for menstrual cups to apply pressure to the bladder or urethra.  This is an experience that most individuals have to varying degrees. If it causes discomfort it can be frustration to know how to articulate, to get help, or solve the issue.

We have taken the liberty of making a video that should explain these annoyances. We hope you will watch and learn! Or laugh.

PACII-Normal-Cup-Movement

This graphic above should help make it a bit clearer where the cup sits in relation to the bladder/urethra and why it may cause pressure. You’ll know this is a problem if peeing with a menstrual cup takes longer than usual and/or your urine stream is slower.  You may also feel the urge to pee more frequently while you’re wearing your cup.

Can it be fixed?

Before you jump into a new cup, consider trying a different placement with your current cup (higher or lower in the vagincal canal) or flipping it inside out. A different shape or position may be enough to help if the pressure is a minor annoyance.

PACII-Bladder-PressureBladder Pressure
PACII-Urethral-PressureUrethral Pressure

If you find that you simply cannot resolve the issue with your current cup you can most likely address the issue with another menstrual cup. Consider a cup that sits lower inside the vaginal canal, has a less pronounced rim (like Lily Cup) or is made from a softer type of silicone or TPE (like Super Jennie, Sckoon, or a soft MeLuna).

You don’t have to stop using the cup you currently have if you aren’t bothered by slower urination or bladder pressure. (It’s inconvenient if you need to pee in a hurry but personally I’ve never been bothered enough to use a softer cup since firmer is easier for me).

 

Need help finding another cup to try?  

Consult our menstrual cup comparison chart, try our menstrual cup quiz, or for help or ask a question on our Q+A forum if you need more menstrual cup guidance.

Peeing with a menstrual cup: There are things to know!

Put A Cup In It

Menstrual education with a twist by Kim Rosas & Amanda Hearn. Thanks for being here!

- Kimanda

5 thoughts on “Peeing With A Menstrual Cup

  • Rose

    This was amazing! This helped me know that my slow peeing with my cup is a normal issue that I can fix. Thank you very much.

    Reply
  • Diamond C.

    Thank you SO much for this article! It had been driving me nuts that I couldn’t find any info on this! Not only can I not pee with the cup in AT ALL, but it moves horizontally and causes a leak despite the “air tight” sound when I remove it. I didn’t know turning it inside out was an option either!

    Reply
  • Sal

    Hello there! I have a bladder problem, particularly incontinence. I took the quiz (and said that I have heavy incontinence) but it gave me Lunette 2 or Lena Large, the two cups you said are firm. Are they okay?

    Reply
  • tendai

    i would like to know more about menstrual cups and how to insert them

    Reply
  • Nicole

    I have major bladder sensitivity I’ve been dealing with chronic UTIs for the past year as well as kidney issues I’ve had three children over the age of 30 and it says that I should have a very firm cup but with my bladder Sensitivity I can’t what are my options

    Reply

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