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Using Menstrual Cups With Heavy Periods

We are often asked if a menstrual cup can be used with a heavy flow. The short answer is yes but it’s more involved than that. Though many who are cup-curious feel that they have a heavy flow most quickly learn that they really don’t bleed as much as their tampons or pads may have implied. In fact, the average menstrual fluid released each cycle is only around 30-60 ml (or 2-4 tablespoons).

To get to the bottom of this we decided to go head-to-head… or vag-to-vag… with our heavy bleeding pal, Jen. We each measured our flow for one cycle. We (Kim & Amanda) came in around 18 ml (a bit more than a tablespoon) while Jen poured out 225 ml (or nearly a cup). That’s 4-8x the normal amount!!!

It’s hard to imagine keeping up with day to day activities with such a heavy period and it was, until Jen finally found her perfect combination to make her periods livable. We’ve also teamed up with the maker of Jen’s favorite cup (spoiler: Super Jennie) and a maker of period underwear, EvaWear to make this video possible (along with some other cool stuff you’ll see down below!)

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Jen has finally reached the cherished status of #periodnirvana That’s when you forget you’re on your period thanks to a cup!

We hope you enjoy this video featuring Jen and her heavy, heavy period. It’s full of great information about how she made the switch from her Diva Cup (a 30 ml capacity cup) and back up cloth pads to a high capacity cup (she purchased the Super Jennie L *a 41 ml capacity cup* after taking our quiz) and period panties.

If you’re experiencing heavy periods similar to Jen we would suggest looking at our Menstrual Cup Comparison Chart to find the cups with the highest capacity. Even though the Super Jennie L is what Jen uses it may not be the right cup for you based on other factors such as the length (noted on the chart) or the fact that it’s a softer cup (meaning it can be more difficult to open and create a seal, especially for newbies to menstrual cups). If you believe you need a firmer cup with the next highest capacity is the Yuuki L at 37 ml.

We understand it can be extremely difficult to manage periods of this magnitude but if anything is capable of aiding it — it’s a menstrual cup! Even average capacity cups (24-30 ml) will hold more than SUPER Tampons (they max out around 18 ml) but moving to a higher capacity cup and coupling that with a good pair of period panties *just in case* is your best and most comfortable, worry free, option.

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We’d like to thank Super Jennie and EvaWear Period Panty for helping us make this video possible. When we decided to make a video about heavy flows it only made sense to partner with Super Jennie. We even filmed the video before they signed on to sponsor so all the brand mentions are 100% organic. We didn’t know they have a sister brand that makes affordable period underwear so check those out of you need something for back up or just want to wear them in anticipation of your period!

Menstrual Cups for Heavy Periods

One thought on “Using Menstrual Cups With Heavy Periods

  • Maria

    I am a heavy bleeder, too. Most of my bleeding happens during the second and third day. But problem is, large cups are too large for me (I tried two different ones). So I have to deal with small ones. It is not the same every time – sometimes, I have to be in the bathroom every half hour. On average, on heavy days, 2 hours are the most until the cup is full. But I will definitely consider the panties. Before cups, I used a tampon and a pad at the same time at heavy days and still had accidents. So, yes, I would recommend cups for heavy bleeders even if they use small ones.

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